Archive for the 'Hunting' Category

Hunting: Hunting Around the Edges

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Andy Gluesenkamp's son, Jack, with a rabbit harvest.

Andy Gluesenkamp’s son, Jack, with a rabbit harvest.



This is Passport to Texas

Expect success nearly every outing when rabbit hunting—especially when you hunt around the edges.

04—[Those are] Areas where people aren’t necessarily going to be conducting other activities.

Andy Gluesenkamp, a herpetologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife, and an avid rabbit hunter, says hunting rabbits provides a “walk in the woods” experience. But what about those edges?

21—You would look for fence lines along fallow fields, or old pasture, or berry patches and cactus patches… So, there’s less competition with other land use – like cattle grazing. Rabbit hunting usually won’t disturb cattle. Or, you’re not going to be competing with deer hunters who are going to be in another kind of habitat.

Ask landowners about hunting their property, or consider hunting on Texas Parks and Wildlife’s public lands. Hunt rabbits year-round; however, the cooler months have their advantages.

14—It’s pleasant – getting back to that walking in the woods experience – also in summertime when it’s really dry, they can be a lot leaner. I prefer to eat them when they have a little bit of fat on them. If there’s green grass on the ground – that’s the perfect time
to go rabbit hunting.

Rabbit as a tasty treat. That’s tomorrow.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series and is funded by your purchase of fishing and hunting equipment and motor boat fuel.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunting: Rabbits

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

Rabbit photo courtesy TPWD

Rabbit photo courtesy TPWD



This is Passport to Texas

When most people think of hunting, they think: deer, dove, duck and feral hogs. But, TPW herpetologist, Andy Gluesenkamp, isn’t most people.

04—I hunt primarily rabbits; rabbit hunting is really near and dear to my heart.

Andy’s love affair with rabbit hunting started when he was a boy spending time in the field alongside his father.

15—I have really fond memories of hunting rabbits with my dad. So, I can say I think it’s the best way to start kids on hunting,
because I can look at my personal experience and tie my love of nature all the way back to those early experiences.

Hunting for small game like rabbit has its own rhythm.

12—Rabbit hunting is the perfect balance between the abject boredom that goes with sitting in a deer blind, and maybe or maybe not seeing a deer, and maybe or maybe not getting to shoot at it, and the battle zone, front line, fire fest that can be a good day
of dove hunting. So, somewhere between being bored out of your socks and sounding like you’re in an air raid is rabbit hunting.

Andy Gluesenkamp says it’s like a walk in the woods interspersed with the excitement of sighting your prey and taking a good shot. More on rabbit hunting tomorrow.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program supports our series and is funded by your purchase of fishing and hunting equipment and motor boat fuel.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunt/Cook: Alligator Ancho Rellenos

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Alligator Ancho Relleno, image from El Chile Café y Cantina

Alligator Ancho Relleno, image from El Chile Café y Cantina



This is Passport to Texas

Hunting alligator in Texas is an adrenaline pumping experience, but cooking it shouldn’t be. Chef Jeff Martinez, chef at El Chile Café y Cantina in Austin, whips up a Mexican inspired treat with alligator meat.

57—So, what I’ve done is I’ve taken the meat and I’ve ground it up in my food processor. And so what we’re going to do with this today is we’re going to make an alligator ancho chile relleno. I’ve got a hot pan here; we’re going to start by adding extra virgin olive oil in the bottom. We’re going to add our white onion which has been diced up. We’re going to add our garlic. Oh, I can smell it already; it’s already starting to smell good. Okay, so after that, we’re going to add our tomato. Now, we’re going to go ahead and add our alligator meat. It’s pretty much going to look the same as cooked chicken. And it doesn’t take very long. And that’s just about it. So, we’re going to add a little bit more flavor to this dish by throwing in some sliced green olives; and then we’re going to add some of these raisins, and we’re going to finish it off with slivered almonds that have been toasted. You see everything in there and it looks great. There’s a lot of color in there – a lot of color also means a lot of flavor. And then we’re going to finish it off with some fresh chopped parsley that’s going to add some freshness to the dish. And then to finish it off, we’re going to salt – just to taste. And we are ready to stuff some chiles.

See Chef Martinez in action, and find the complete recipe on the TPW YouTube Channel.

That’s our show for today. For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV/Hunting: Alligators

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

American Alligator, photo TPWD

American Alligator, photo TPWD



This is Passport to Texas

It’s a hot muggy afternoon in an east Texas marsh, and it’s time to hunt for alligators. We tag along with some lucky hunters that get a chance of a lifetime to hunt alligators at J.D. Murphree Wildlife Management Area.

54—The area that we’re hunting in, it’s a vast bayou of swamps and marshes, with canals running through. The adrenaline rush is way more than deer hunting or anything else because you’re after something that can actually get you.

There’s one probably about 10 foot and two seven footers right up here. In about 150 yards we’re going to try and put a set.

Never been gator hunting before. You know you see ‘em on TV. See the alligator shows. And, this is exactly what it looks like.

Our bait is chicken thigh quarters…

Those smell savory.

It’s savory; that’s for sure. Mmmm.

And we let ‘em sit out in the sun for a day or two and it got quite ripe.

Upwind is better than downwind when you get those things out. [distant laughter] I am amped up; adrenaline’s pumping, and then it’s on!

Alligator hunting – it’s just not like anything else I’ve ever done. You know, there’s one on the line and you start pulling me in. I don’t know. You get anxious, you get excited. You get nervous.

But did they get their gator? Find out on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series the week of February 23. Check local listings.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program supports our series… For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunting: Women Learning to Hunt

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

Women relaxing after the hunt. Image from National Shooting Sports.

Women relaxing after the hunt. Image from National Shooting Sports.



This is Passport to Texas

(AMB: Gunshot…”good enough…next”) [:03]

That’s how a group of ten women started a weekend hunting trip at a Hill Country ranch – by taking practice shots at targets. Ranch manager Troy Calloway explains.

08—Sometimes we get people out here who have never shot before, so we set ‘em up and assess the situation….. But everybody here is nailing it; we’re good to go it looks like.

Hunt coordinator, Tami Moore, told me that women make up less than 10% of all licensed hunters, and she thinks she may know why.

10—I think a lot of women are afraid that they’re going to fail, because they’re just scared. And going out with another group of ladies, in a situation like we are this weekend, takes a lot of that out of it.

Kathy Keller of Austin is an experienced hunter. We spoke in her deer blind.

08—Oh, this is really great. And it’s exciting to see that women are getting into this sport and learning about hunting and wildlife.

Kathy explains what it was like the first time she harvested an animal.

09—It was something that made me think. I’ve taken this life, and I had to think about why I was doing it. And I realized that it is a big responsibility.

Find hunting information and resources on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website. The Wildlife Restoration Program supports our series and works to increase hunting and shooting opportunities in Texas.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.