Archive for the 'Hunting' Category

Hunt/Cook: Alligator Ancho Rellenos

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Alligator Ancho Relleno, image from El Chile Café y Cantina

Alligator Ancho Relleno, image from El Chile Café y Cantina



This is Passport to Texas

Hunting alligator in Texas is an adrenaline pumping experience, but cooking it shouldn’t be. Chef Jeff Martinez, chef at El Chile Café y Cantina in Austin, whips up a Mexican inspired treat with alligator meat.

57—So, what I’ve done is I’ve taken the meat and I’ve ground it up in my food processor. And so what we’re going to do with this today is we’re going to make an alligator ancho chile relleno. I’ve got a hot pan here; we’re going to start by adding extra virgin olive oil in the bottom. We’re going to add our white onion which has been diced up. We’re going to add our garlic. Oh, I can smell it already; it’s already starting to smell good. Okay, so after that, we’re going to add our tomato. Now, we’re going to go ahead and add our alligator meat. It’s pretty much going to look the same as cooked chicken. And it doesn’t take very long. And that’s just about it. So, we’re going to add a little bit more flavor to this dish by throwing in some sliced green olives; and then we’re going to add some of these raisins, and we’re going to finish it off with slivered almonds that have been toasted. You see everything in there and it looks great. There’s a lot of color in there – a lot of color also means a lot of flavor. And then we’re going to finish it off with some fresh chopped parsley that’s going to add some freshness to the dish. And then to finish it off, we’re going to salt – just to taste. And we are ready to stuff some chiles.

See Chef Martinez in action, and find the complete recipe on the TPW YouTube Channel.

That’s our show for today. For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV/Hunting: Alligators

Thursday, February 20th, 2014

American Alligator, photo TPWD

American Alligator, photo TPWD



This is Passport to Texas

It’s a hot muggy afternoon in an east Texas marsh, and it’s time to hunt for alligators. We tag along with some lucky hunters that get a chance of a lifetime to hunt alligators at J.D. Murphree Wildlife Management Area.

54—The area that we’re hunting in, it’s a vast bayou of swamps and marshes, with canals running through. The adrenaline rush is way more than deer hunting or anything else because you’re after something that can actually get you.

There’s one probably about 10 foot and two seven footers right up here. In about 150 yards we’re going to try and put a set.

Never been gator hunting before. You know you see ‘em on TV. See the alligator shows. And, this is exactly what it looks like.

Our bait is chicken thigh quarters…

Those smell savory.

It’s savory; that’s for sure. Mmmm.

And we let ‘em sit out in the sun for a day or two and it got quite ripe.

Upwind is better than downwind when you get those things out. [distant laughter] I am amped up; adrenaline’s pumping, and then it’s on!

Alligator hunting – it’s just not like anything else I’ve ever done. You know, there’s one on the line and you start pulling me in. I don’t know. You get anxious, you get excited. You get nervous.

But did they get their gator? Find out on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series the week of February 23. Check local listings.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration program supports our series… For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunting: Women Learning to Hunt

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

Women relaxing after the hunt. Image from National Shooting Sports.

Women relaxing after the hunt. Image from National Shooting Sports.



This is Passport to Texas

(AMB: Gunshot…”good enough…next”) [:03]

That’s how a group of ten women started a weekend hunting trip at a Hill Country ranch – by taking practice shots at targets. Ranch manager Troy Calloway explains.

08—Sometimes we get people out here who have never shot before, so we set ‘em up and assess the situation….. But everybody here is nailing it; we’re good to go it looks like.

Hunt coordinator, Tami Moore, told me that women make up less than 10% of all licensed hunters, and she thinks she may know why.

10—I think a lot of women are afraid that they’re going to fail, because they’re just scared. And going out with another group of ladies, in a situation like we are this weekend, takes a lot of that out of it.

Kathy Keller of Austin is an experienced hunter. We spoke in her deer blind.

08—Oh, this is really great. And it’s exciting to see that women are getting into this sport and learning about hunting and wildlife.

Kathy explains what it was like the first time she harvested an animal.

09—It was something that made me think. I’ve taken this life, and I had to think about why I was doing it. And I realized that it is a big responsibility.

Find hunting information and resources on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website. The Wildlife Restoration Program supports our series and works to increase hunting and shooting opportunities in Texas.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunting: Girls with Guns

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Getting into the field.

Getting into the field.



This is Passport to Texas

Early in my tenure at Texas Parks and Wildlife I was an observer on a women only hunting trip in the Hill Country. Tami Moore was Hunt Coordinator.

09-We’re trying to get women involved in the outdoors, and to take some of the mystery out of the sport of hunting. Before it’s just been something that the guys go do.

The women’s skill levels varied from novice to pro. Each woman brought a guide with them; first time hunter, Millissa Salinas of Austin, brought her father Ralph.

10-I’ve always wanted to experience the outdoors, and I thought the perfect opportunity to bond with my father would be this event so he could show me the ropes and spend some special memories together.

Like all the women on the trip, Salinas was enthusiastic about the opportunity.

11-We’d been preparing for it for about a month. He had taken me target shooting, I had borrowed a rifle. So I’d been anticipating for some time now. So when the actual moment came, it was extremely exciting.

Salinas harvested two deer on that trip. Hunting with other women and her father made for an experience that she intends to recreate with other family members.

07-We definitely want to get involved more in the outdoors. And I have a younger sister that we’re going to try to encourage to join us.

Find hunting resources on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website. The Wildlife Restoration Program supports our series and works to increase hunting and shooting opportunities in Texas.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunting: Impact of Conservation Order

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014

Geese at Bonham State Park

Geese at Bonham State Park



This is Passport to Texas

By 1999 it was clear: an overpopulation of light geese was ravaging its arctic nesting grounds. Without intervention, scientists believed this unique ecosystem would collapse.

05— So, in an effort to try to stem that tide, the light goose conservation order began.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Small Game Program Director, Dave Morrison, says Texas was prepared to do its part.

08— When we started the conservation order, Texas’ harvest during the conservation order was a little over a hundred thousand birds. So, when it started, we knew what to do.

For the past 14 years, this annual management action has occurred primarily in the country’s three eastern flyways; engaging hunters from Canada to Texas.

10—Since that time, you’ve seen a decline in total harvest in Texas from about 100-thousand to about 12-thousand in the last hunting season; there are fewer geese being seen on the coastal zone of Texas.

There are fewer light geese coming to Texas, but their overall population continues to grow. Changes in agricultural practices in the flyway’s midsection may put more food on the ground, and that may keep birds from coming this far south.

12—There are still increased numbers of white geese out there, to such an extent that we had the council vote to increase the daily bag limit during the regular season from 20 to 50.

What that will mean for Texas, tomorrow. The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series… For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.