Archive for the 'Texas Outdoor Family' Category

Partner with Texas Outdoor Families

Thursday, December 10th, 2015
Texas Outdoor Family Workshop.

Texas Outdoor Family Workshop at Inks Lake State Park


This is Passport to Texas

Being popular is a good problem to have for the Texas Outdoor Families program. It means lots of people want to learn how to engage the outdoors. To accommodate as many families as possible, program director, Robert Owen says Texas Outdoor Families is recruiting and training nonprofit community partners to facilitate the weekend campouts.

13 — We’re setting up these partners to run an event with some ranger guidance in the beginning, and then turning them loose after we feel confident in their abilities to have a safe, low, impact and fun time in a state park.

After a successful 3-year pilot program in Houston, Owen says they’re expanding to Dallas-Fort Worth, Austin and San Antonio.

14—We’re looking to grow by quite a few partners. In order for folks to get on board, would encourage them to give me a call to talk over the program and the opportunities and just hear where this organization is coming from—to see how our goals overlap.

Owens says the program needs at least 10 nonprofit community partners in each region.

24— We hope that organizations see the return in time spent outside. Some recent research has suggested that youth benefit from time spent outside through unstructured play, but also through the opportunity to make their own decisions and find themselves in a challenging environment. And camping does provide that. It’s very much a growth experience.

Find Robert Owen’s contact information and details about the program at texasstateparks.org/tof

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Texas Outdoor Family Reboot

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015
How to put up a tent.

Robert Owen demonstrates putting up a tent at a Texas Outdoor Family Weekend Workshop.

This is Passport to Texas

The Texas Outdoor Family program from Texas Parks and Wildlife introduces families to the outdoors. Program coordinator, Robert Owen, says the program is entering a new phase, casting a wider net to encourage overnight park use by diverse audiences.

12 — We noticed that state park visitation did not represent the diversity of Texas, and we wanted to see that change. So, we Started to partner with community organizations that represent under-served audiences.

Using grant money, they created a 3-year pilot program in Houston, and worked with partner non-profit organizations that shared the goals of getting folks outdoors to enjoy healthier, happier lifestyles.

08—Houston is a wonderful melting pot. It represents cultures from all over the world, and a great diversity of Texas.

Owen and staff trained their partners how to facilitate an outdoor family experience.

12— We’re not just going to ask people to get out into the field and lead a workshop for a hundred people with no training. Instead, we like to set folks up for success with our master outdoor leadership training.

Robert Owen says, Texas Outdoor Family is now expanding the program to include DFW, Austin and San Antonio, and is looking for a few good partners.

12— We’re growing in those new markets. So, we are looking for those non-profit organizations that serve an audience that’s 50% free or reduced lunch. Or, a recipient of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Co-op grant program.

Find contact information at texasstateparks.org/tof.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Health: Benefits of Time Spent in Nature

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015
Fishing: Gateway to outdoor obsession.

Fishing: Gateway to outdoor obsession.


This is Passport to Texas

With more than a million acres of public parks and wild spaces in Texas, opportunities to get outside abound, and so do the health benefits of being active outdoors.

Adult men and women should carve out at least 30 minutes a day for some kind of physical activity. For children, that time grows to a full hour. Regular body-moving, heart-pumping movement builds muscle and develops balance and flexibility – among other benefits.

From daytime and guided night hikes, to star gazing, bike and equestrian trails, bird watching, to swimming, rock climbing, paddling, and geocaching – state and local parks offer a chance to get outside no matter your interest or ability. Your imagination is really the only
thing standing between you and what you can do outdoors.

Of course, you can always go to the gym to log your 30 minutes of activity a day, but when nature is your fitness center your workouts will all seem like play. Side stepping puddles, leaping up rocks, and traversing up and down hills exercise your balance and stability in
addition to the cardiovascular system…not to mention what being in the wide open spaces breathing fresh air can do for your peace of mind.

The outdoor alternative is also more affordable than the gym, as many state parks offer low-cost admission. So go ahead and get out, because life’s better outside. Find a park or scenic trail near you at texasstateparks.org.

That’s our show for today… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Recreation: Healthier, Happier, Smarter

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

 

Time outdoors makes families healthier, happier and smarter -- because Life's Better Outside.

Time outdoors makes families healthier, happier and smarter — because Life’s Better Outside.


This is Passport to Texas

There’s big push to get children outdoors. But kids aren’t the only ones who benefit from fresh air and sunshine. Survey says: Adults of all ages—as well as the kiddos—can achieve a better quality of life by committing to spending time in the wide open spaces…as well as the forested spaces…or watery spaces… Education and outreach director, Nancy Herron, shares some thoughts.

40— When you spend time outdoors you can be healthier, happier and smarter.

Those are some big claims there, Nancy. What do we mean by that?

Actually there is a lot of research that’s out there that shows that people of all ages actually do have benefits from being outside in nature, and that does include improvements to your health, your stress level, your sense of self esteem and confidence. Even being more cooperative. Can you believe that? Communities are more cooperative; families bond better in the out of doors. These are interesting things that we now know that we took for granted, and we just didn’t realize. That there’s a whole bevy of benefits from being outdoors.

Get healthier… happier…and smarter in the New Year when you spend time outdoors. Because, Life’s Better Outside…and so are you.

Happy New Year from Texas Parks and Wildlife and all of us at Passport to Texas …I’m Cecilia Nasti.