Archive for the 'TPW Mag' Category

The Future of Print Editions of TPW Magazine

Friday, February 10th, 2017
Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine: Then, now, always.

Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine: Then, now, always.

This is Passport to Texas

Technological advancements have changed the way we consume information. Many of us have put down newspapers, magazine and books in favor of digital devices.

Even the 75 year old Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine has an APP. So, I checked in with Editor, Louie Bond, to get her thoughts on whether she believes this outdoor magazine of Texas it will remain a print publication.

I truly believe that we will always have a print copy.

I think that there’s a great love for readers young and old to have that quiet time that you spend away from all screens—and to just hold that magazine in your hand and turn the page and see what surprise is next—rather than looking up a certain topic digitally and seeing it that way.

So for me, I’m an old school paper, print journalism person. So, I love the experience of picking up a magazine and not knowing what the next page is going to bring. And I don’t think you get that same feeling in an app.

However, a lot of young people get their information digitally. So, that enables us to reach both audiences. And it doesn’t really take anything away from our print magazine to add digital viewers as well.

The January/February issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now. You can also download the app from tpwmagazine.com.

That’s our show for today… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Biggest Change for TPW Magazine in 75 Years

Thursday, February 9th, 2017
The TPW Magazine App gives readers the monthly issues of the magazine and so much more.

The TPW Magazine App gives readers the monthly issues of the magazine and so much more.

This is Passport to Texas

Generations of Texans have enjoyed Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine. This year the publication observes its seventy-five year anniversary. I asked editor, Louie Bond, what she considers one of biggest changes to the magazine since the first issue debuted in 1942.

I’ve now been the editor for 10 years. In Parks and Wildlife terms, that’s short. But for me, it feels like a good, solid block of time. And I think definitely the biggest thing we’ve done—in the past decade—is the addition of the app.

It started out as just a page turner on our website—it seemed the easiest way to go from print to digital. But now, with the advent of so many technological changes, we can add so much more to the app than just a digital reading of the story. There’s more movement. There’s videos. There’s additional material that doesn’t fit into the print magazine. There will be whole slideshows of additional photos.

If there’s historical documents in the article, we can show those in more detail. And so, it opens a lot of new doors for storytelling for us. And a way to reach younger readers.

Download the app from the Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine website and enjoy the magazine of Texas in a new way.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV — A Magazine is Born

Friday, February 3rd, 2017
Texas parks and Wildlife Magazine covers from 75 years.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine collage made from 75 years of covers.

This is Passport to Texas

Over its 75 year history, a changing dedicated staff of writers, editors, photographers, artists and others, have lovingly crafted each page of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

[Louie Bond] It doesn’t really matter how many people you have when you have really dedicated, really talented people.
[Russell Roe] Our challenge always is to kind of tell the story of conservation in interesting ways.
[Nathan Adams] How are we going to tell this story in a way that resonates?
[Sonja Sommerfeld] Everything is a collaboration. We each bring our own little taste to the table…
[Nathan Adams] Everyone gets to come in and offer suggestions. That’s a nicer than saying argue.
[Russell Roe] That kind of creative tension helps us create a better magazine.
[Louie Bond] The most important thing about magazine planning is the term ‘long range’. A year and a half in advance is completely mapped out.
[Chase Fountain] Time constraints. You know, there’s a deadline.
[Earl Nottingham] We try to push ‘em sometimes.

We heard editor, Louie Bond, managing editor, Russell Roe, Art Director, Nathan Adams, photo editor, Sonja Sommerfeld, and photographers: Chase Fountain and Earl Nottingham.

Go behind the scenes of this award-winning publication on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS, the week of February 5th. Check your local listings.

Funding for our show provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Celebrating 75 Years of TPW Magazine

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017
Orville Rice’s iconic artwork graced covers of Texas Game and Fish for a decade (1945-1955). Scanned from Family Archives, Dinah Chancellor

Orville Rice’s iconic artwork graced covers of Texas Game and Fish for a decade (1945-1955). Scanned from Family Archives, Dinah Chancellor

This is Passport to Texas

All year long Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine plans to make room in its issues to celebrate its 75th anniversary.

The biggest celebrations will be in January and December [2017]. The issue we’re just putting to bed for January/February will contain a history of the magazine and a feature on Orville Rice. And both of those are written by longtime staffers who have now retired.

I spoke with Magazine Editor Louie Bond in November of last year about this year’s issues.

Throughout the year, we’re going to do some scrapbooks of different decades and some of the funny things. We’ve picked out our special favorites, and we’re going to be sharing those with readers every month.

But you’ll have to keep tabs on the magazine to find out just what those funny things might be.

And then December is kind of a secret. We’re going to do something we’ve never done in 75 years. And, we’re going to really save it as a surprise. But we’ll be doing the entire issue in a different way that we’ve never done before. So, I’m just going to hang that out there, and you y’all need to hang around ‘til December to see what kind of special fun we have for the actual month of the anniversary.

With as fast as these years are going, December will be here before you know it. The January/February issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine’s Year of State Parks

Friday, December 9th, 2016
Palo Duro Canyon Glow

Palo Duro Canyon Glow

This is Passport to Texas

Of Texas’ more than 90 State Parks, some stand out as iconic. And others not so much.

I think like Ray Roberts might not be one of those iconic parks like Enchanted Rock or Garner State Park—even though it’s huge and a lot of people use it.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine Editor, Louie Bond says, Lake Ray Roberts State Park still made it into the publication’s yearlong celebration of state parks. While iconic sites got top billing, Bond says most parks got some love.

We tried to include everyone; we almost got them all. But, we included them in groups, like parks with great swimming holes, parks where you might want to take a hike, parks where you could ride a bike. And then grouped some parks by interest, like parks where you could take a photo of a great view—and just let people have a broader scope of what’s available in a state park system.

To close out 2016: one of the most iconic parks of all.

It’s Palo Duro. And, interestingly enough, as we went to press, the Washington Post ran an article on Palo Duro, and they said: you know, that canyon in Arizona may be larger, but Palo Duro ranks right up there with it.

You can read all the articles on state parks from this year online or when you download the Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine APP from iTunes or the Apple Store.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.