Archive for the 'Woodpecker damage' Category

Avoiding Woodpecker Damage

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015
Redbellied Woodpecker

Redbellied Woodpecker

This is Passport to Texas

As a rule, woodpeckers excavate cavities in dead trees, called snags, which they then live in. The exception to the rule occurs when in their home building zeal, they mistake dark colored house siding, for a snag. When they do—homeowners have problems.

And it looks like cannon balls have been shot through the house. Maybe two or three; and we’ve seen some with fifteen, sixteen holes.

Cliff Shackelford is a non-game ornithologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife. He says woodpecker damage occurs most often in urban and suburban areas where homeowners removed dead wood from their property.

What we recommend people to do with problems with woodpeckers is to put a nest box. If you’re familiar with a bluebird box, it’s just a larger version of that custom made for woodpeckers.

Visit passporttotexas.org for a link to information and free blueprints to make your own woodpecker nest box.

People can build this in a couple of hours on the weekend, and put it up on the side of the house, and in all cases that we’ve done this – it’s worked. And the woodpecker stops chiseling on the home, and goes to this next box, and is very content.

That’s our show for today… For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

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Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-headed Woodpecker

Red-headed Woodpecker

  • Floor – 6 inches by 6 inches
  • Depth – 12 inches
  • Entrance height above floor – 10 inches
  • Entrance diameter – 2 inches
  • Recommended height above ground – 10 to 20 feet

 

Northern Flicker
Northern Flicker
Photo by Terry Spivey, USDA Forest Service
www.forestryimages.org

 

Northern Flicker

  • Floor – 7 inches by 7 inches
  • Depth – 16 to 18 inches
  • Entrance height above floor – 14 to 16 inches
  • Entrance diameter – 2½ inches
  • Recommended height above ground – 6 to 20 feet

 

 

The Problem with Woodpeckers

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015
Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker


This is Passport to Texas

If you live in East Texas, and have noticed strange holes in the wood siding of your home… don’t call the police; call an ornithologist.

08—There are fifteen species of woodpeckers in Texas, eight of which are in the eastern third of Texas. And that’s where we get most of our calls of woodpecker damage.

Non-game ornithologist, Cliff Shackelford, says the pileated and red bellied woodpeckers are among the culprits inflicting the damage to these homes.

15—What happens a lot of time is that they see these houses that might be painted brown, they might have cedar siding, and this is very attractive to the birds to try to excavate a cavity. So, they’re not looking for food when they’re doing this; they’re looking to make a cavity to call home.

The pileated woodpecker, about the size of a crow, can excavate holes as big as a man’s fist — and not just in the outside walls of your home, either.

11—That’s right. We’ve documented pileateds going through into the sheetrock and into the room of the house. Of course, they’re very lost when they do that, they quickly go out. They’re not looking to make a mess of the house.

Keeping woodpeckers from damaging your home…that’s tomorrow.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.