Archive for the 'TPW Mag' Category

TPW Magazine–After Hurricane Harvey

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017
Game Wardens evacuating flood victims after Hurricane Harvey. Image by Earl Nottingham.

Game Wardens evacuating flood victims after Hurricane Harvey. Image by Earl Nottingham.

This is Passport to Texas

The November issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine includes stories from Hurricane Harvey. But that wasn’t the original plan.

By the time we write about something, send it off to press, get it back—months can go by. So, we had to really fast-track this November issue, and decided to remove a couple of stories. We don’t have our usual travel feature or our wander list.

Editor, Louie Bond, says she wanted to tell the story of Harvey from the Texas Parks and Wildlife standpoint.

We decided to forego all of the stuff that people had been seeing over and over again and just tell our own story—and that’s what we did. So, we told the story from the perspective of game wardens and rescuers, from those who were being rescued. And the impact, of course, on state parks, wildlife management areas, and wildlife, itself.

Read about Game Warden Dustin Dockery, who spent days helping others, as his own home was consumed by floodwaters. Hear from Texas Parks and Wildlife Photographer Earl Nottingham, who also covered Hurricanes Ike and Katrina.

And I asked him what was different about Harvey. And he said he believed that the Texas spirit had never been more present. People would see the logo on his truck, and they would pull up with boats in the back of their trucks and say: Where can we go? What can we do? As the crisis is happening. They didn’t waste a moment.

The November issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now.

Our show receives funding from Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine — Texas Brigades

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017
Learning conservation with Texas Brigades.

Learning conservation with Texas Brigades.

This is Passport to Texas

Texas Brigades is a wildlife and natural resource focused leadership development program for youth, 13 to 17.

Texas Brigades has been around for 25 years. It started out as Bobwhite Brigade back in 1993, and then it just kind of morphed.

It’s morphed into is eight summer camps, each with a different conservation focus. Aubry Buzek [Byu-zik] wrote about the Brigades for the October issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

What was really interesting is that these camps are not necessarily about learning about one particular species. At Bobwhite Brigade, they were learning a lot about quail—and they had biologists there teaching them about quail. But that wasn’t the overall goal of the program. It was about being comfortable with public speaking, comfortable talking with their peers. Debating.

These five-day intensive camps incorporate military marching and cadence, and introduce students to experts and activities that challenge and

I talked to a lot of parents after graduation and they were like, ‘Who is this kid?’ I saw it too. That confidence. A lot of parents said they didn’t expect their kid to know just so much. But, in addition to that knowledge, these kids are loud, and they’re marching, and they make a lot of friends. It really is a transformative camp.

Read Aubry Buzek’s story about the Texas Brigades in the October issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine — The New Natives

Thursday, July 13th, 2017
Some things never change.

Some things never change.

This is Passport to Texas

There’s a provocative article in the July issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine I want to tell you about. In it, author Russell Roe essentially explores evolution.

He writes that the mix of plants and animals you see around you is not what people saw 100 years ago, and it won’t be what people will see 100 years from now. He asks us to consider that “99.99 percent of all species that have lived on Earth have gone extinct.”

This thought-provoking article explains how humans are accelerating ecological change by removing established species, introducing new species, and by diverting the flow of water, among other things. He writes that by doing so, humans are rapidly changing the playing field for life in Texas.

In the article The New Natives [changed to New in Town] in the July issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine, Russell Roe tells readers it’s difficult to untangle the web of cause-and-effect that led to the mix of species we see today, adding that iconic species that once defined the character of natural regions have been lost not only from the landscape, but also from the collective memory of generations of Texans.

He closes the article by putting the spotlight on three of Texas’ iconic species to illustrate how they have changed and adapted over time.

Find The New Natives in the July issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Campstravaganza

Monday, April 3rd, 2017
Guale #2 at Big Bend Ranch State Park

Guale #2 at Big Bend Ranch State Park

This is Passport to Texas

The Texas State Park system has close to 8,000 campsites. In the April issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine, father and son—Russell and Luke Roe—highlight the available prime “real estate”.

You know the places: great views, near water, or shaded by an ancient oak; spacious—or, perhaps, secluded.

In the section, the Roes reveal site and shelter numbers of these coveted spots: such as Guale #2 at Big Bend Ranch State Park in West Texas; this remote site, only accessible by four-wheeler, offers visitors spectacular views of sunsets that will change your life.

Site #65 at Caprock Canyons State Park in the Panhandle, offers solitude, the beauty of the shimmering red-rock Canyonlands, a covered picnic shelter, and a stunning view of Little Red River.

Site #92 at Inks Lake State Park  in the Hill Country is everything you want a camping getaway to be, with the perfect balance of shade, convenience, privacy, scenery and lake access. Boaters can moor their boats at the site, and the sunsets will take your breath away.

The special section of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine has an illustrated Native American story you can tell around the campfire, tips on setting up the perfect campsite, and eight new s’mores recipes!

That’s our show for today… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

The Future of Print Editions of TPW Magazine

Friday, February 10th, 2017
Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine: Then, now, always.

Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine: Then, now, always.

This is Passport to Texas

Technological advancements have changed the way we consume information. Many of us have put down newspapers, magazine and books in favor of digital devices.

Even the 75 year old Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine has an APP. So, I checked in with Editor, Louie Bond, to get her thoughts on whether she believes this outdoor magazine of Texas it will remain a print publication.

I truly believe that we will always have a print copy.

I think that there’s a great love for readers young and old to have that quiet time that you spend away from all screens—and to just hold that magazine in your hand and turn the page and see what surprise is next—rather than looking up a certain topic digitally and seeing it that way.

So for me, I’m an old school paper, print journalism person. So, I love the experience of picking up a magazine and not knowing what the next page is going to bring. And I don’t think you get that same feeling in an app.

However, a lot of young people get their information digitally. So, that enables us to reach both audiences. And it doesn’t really take anything away from our print magazine to add digital viewers as well.

The January/February issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now. You can also download the app from tpwmagazine.com.

That’s our show for today… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.