Hunt | Food: Cook Venison Low and Slow

Chef Lou Lambert in the field with colleague.

Chef Lou Lambert in the field with colleague.


This is Passport to Texas

Even if you hunt for trophies, there’s some good eating attached to those antlers.

Cooking venison can be intimidating, but Chef Lou Lambert, author of the Big Ranch, Big City Cookbook, is here to help.

60— I grew up hunting and fishing and still do today. But I think most of the lessons I learned about cooking game were more failures than things that worked out well when my mother was cooking. Because I had two brothers, father – we all hunted. So, we always had quail, dove, ducks and deer. And I remember my mother struggling to cook deer, because (and the biggest mistake she made) was not realizing because game is, if you will, grass-fed, all-natural – it does not have the fat content. And, because it is more in motion – the muscles tend to be a little bit tighter, which means tougher. So, lack of fat and more movement tells you that you have to do a slow, moist heat cooking method, unless you have it ground into sausage, or pounded for chicken fried [steaks], most of that deer – 80% — you need to either do a braise or a very slow barbeque smoke method.

Harvesting your own great tasting, sustainable protein is the best reason to hunt. Learn more on the TPW website, and find tasty wild game recipes while you’re there.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

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