Archive for the 'Freshwater Fish' Category

Go Fly-Fishing with a Pro

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2019
Alvin Dedeaux

Alvin Dedeaux

This is Passport to Texas

Members of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation represent a diverse cross section of the population that share a passion for the outdoors. Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation is the nonprofit arm of Texas Parks and Wildlife department  and helps to fund initiatives that conserve our wild places and wild things.

Join TPWF by April the 12th to be entered into a chance to win a half day fly fishing trip with Texas fly-fishing guide Alvin Dedeaux.

Jay Kleberg is Director of Conservation Initiatives at Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation. The Colorado River is the staging area for this fly-fishing trip.

There are very few people who know that the Colorado River that flows through the Hill Country and to the coast has some world-class fishing because it goes through some major urban areas. And Alvin’s one of the few people who really knows that water, and has focused not just on the Hill Country, but the coast and the Colorado River, itself. So, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to go with a true expert.

Become a member of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation by April 12 to be entered in a drawing for a half day of fly-fishing with celebrated fishing guide, Alvin Dedeaux. We’ll speak with him about fly-fishing next time.

People are drawn to it, and once they get into it—for most people—it becomes a lifelong passion.

Learn more about the Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation and how to become a member at wewillnotbetamed.org.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV–Progress on Paddlefish

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

Paddlefish

This is Passport to Texas

Alongside Big Cypress Bayou seems an unusual place to perform a surgical procedure. That doesn’t stop Mike Montagne with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from carrying out surgery on a paddlefish—a species that’s more than 300-million years old.

They are one of the most ancient fishes and species that we have on the planet. They don’t look like any other fish, and they are super cool.

Montagne  inserts an acoustic transmitter into the abdomen of a fish that’s been anesthetized before stitching it up and releasing it back into the water. Receivers along the bank track the fish. Overharvesting and manmade changes to habitat, caused the species to disappear from east Texas waters. Restocking, with an emphasis on recreating natural flows, helped the fish and habitat to rebound.

 [Laura-Ashley Overdyke] The Paddlefish were the perfect poster child to explain and test out our theory that more natural flows would help the forest as well as all these fish and other animals.

[Tim Bister] We’ve been reintroducing paddlefish since about 2014; we started out with about 50 fish that we radio-tagged and pout inside the Big Cypress and Caddo Lake, and we followed those around for about a year. One of the things we really wanted to find out is if the fish would stay in the system…

That was Laura-Ashley Overdyke with the Caddo lake Institute and Biologist Tim Bister.

Find out if the fish stayed in the system, or went over the dam, when you watch the TPW TV Series on PBS this week.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Take Your Kid to Class (Cooking Class)

Monday, July 30th, 2018

Redfish is on the menu for the August 14, 2018 Central Market Wild Game & Fish Cooking Class. Photo: Cecilia Nasti

This is Passport to Texas

Here’s something fun to do before school starts: take the kids to the August Central Market Wild Game and Fish cooking class.

The kids will be back in school soon, so this would be a tasty bonding opportunity. The August 14 cooking class is a collaboration between Texas Parks and Wildlife and Central Market, and takes place at Central Market Cooking Schools in Austin, Houston, San Antonio, Dallas, Fort Worth, Plano and Southlake,

Learn alongside your child as a Texas Parks and Wildlife biologist, hunter education specialist, game warden or angler education instructor joins the class to explain the importance of managing and conserving our natural resources, including wildlife and habitat. They also share interesting trivia about what’s on the plate that night.

Meanwhile, the Central Market Cooking School instructors will guide you as you chop, sear, grill, stir and bake your way to a delicious meal of wild game and fish.

You’ll leave the class with memories, a deeper connection to nature, full bellies and copies the recipes you made in class to try again when you get home. Tasty homework.

Menu for the August 14 Class:

  • Grilled Catfish with Hatch Summer Succotash;
  • Striped Bass Poached with Hatch Chiles & Soy Sauce; and
  • Baked Redfish with Hatch-Tomato Sauce.

Find registration information for the Tuesday, August 14 TPW/Central Market Wild Game and Fish cooking School Class at passporttotexas.org. [Click on the link above, and locate the cooking school closest to you and then click on the date of the class.]

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV–Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame Honoree

Friday, June 15th, 2018

Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame 2017 Honoree: Gulf States Toyota.

This is Passport to Texas

The Texas Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame honors individuals and organizations for their contributions to the sport. Gulf States Toyota is one such inductee.

Gulf States Toyota joined with Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in a private-public partnership to create the Toyota Texas Bass Classic, and also with the Toyota ShareLunker program.

Dave Terre, Texas Parks and Wildlife chief of fish management and research, says Gulf States Toyota, has been a boon to bass fishing…and not just in Texas.

The Toyota Texas bass Classic has been huge for Texas Parks and Wildlife. It’s provided us an opportunity to engage millions of people into fishing—all across Texas, and really across the United States of America.

The Guld State’s support helped double the neighborhood fishin’ lakes in Texas, thus making fishing accessible to more families in the urban core. And its long-term involvement in the ShareLunker program, is legend.

Gulf States Toyota supported the Sharelunker program since 2009. It’s really putting us on a path to create cutting edge science. It’s allowed us to be able to track these fish through DNA.

Gulf States Toyota is in the spotlight next week on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS. Check your local listings.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

#GARWEEK: Gar in Texas

Monday, June 11th, 2018

A man and his gar. #GARWEEK

This is Passport to Texas

Alligator gar are Texas’ largest and most long-lived freshwater fish. People claim to see alligator gar just about everywhere in Texas, but they are one of the most misidentified species of fish around.

The main thing Texans need to know is that there are four species of gar in the state of Texas. And it seems like everybody thinks every gar they see is an alligator gar – and that’s not the case.

Michael Baird, a fisheries biologist for parks and wildlife, says even among the four species of gar that occur in Texas —spotted, longnose, shortnose and alligator gar — this species is unique. The easiest way to tell the difference between alligator gar and spotted gar is in the name.

The spotted gar are the only gar species that have spots all over their head and body.

Longnose gar are the most abundant gar species in the state, but the name of this species also clues anglers to the best way to tell them apart from an alligator gar.

The way you can tell the difference between an alligator gar and a longnose gar is from the top of the fish looking down on the head – if it’s alligator like it’s probably an alligator gar. If it has a really narrow snout it’s probably a longnose gar.

The fourth species – shortnose gar – can only be found in Texas on the Red River below Lake Texoma along the Oklahoma and Arkansas borders.

If you’re up there you might see a shortnose gar, if you’re not there you are not going to see one.

Tomorrow: where to find alligator gar in Texas.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.