Archive for the 'Education' Category

TPW TV: Educating the Educators

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019
Project Wild

Project Wild

This is Passport to Texas

On any given Saturday, someone in Texas is probably getting trained in Project Wild. Kiki Corey oversees the program for Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Project WILD is professional development for educators to help them teach about wildlife and wildlife issues.

Susan Campbell, Education Coordinator for the San Antonio Natural area, says Project WILD isn’t jut about learning the science of nature.

[Susan] You can also teach literacy, you can teach mathematics, you can teach social studies.

[Kiki] The Project WILD activities are experience-based. Regardless of the level of your students, everyone in the class will have shared the same experience with the content and then the teacher has something to work from.

See Project WILD in action on the TPW TV series.

The bear went over the mountain. The bear went over the mountain. The bear went over the mountain. He ate the fish on the mountain, as much as he could eat.

Watch Educating the Educators, the week of June 23, on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS. Check your local listings.

Out series receives support in part from RAM Trucks: Built to Serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

It’s Fun to Get Wild in Class

Tuesday, November 27th, 2018
Project Wild

Project Wild

This is Passport to Texas

The more children learn about nature and wildlife, the greater their potential of becoming good stewards of the land.

That’s the philosophy behind a program from Texas Parks and Wildlife called Project Wild. Project Wild is an environmental education program and conservation education program. The idea behind it is to help young people in grades K-12 learn about wildlife and understand natural resources.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Outreach and Education staff lead workshops that teach adults hands-on activities that incorporate wildlife-related concepts into the teaching of basic learning skills…like math, science, language arts and social studies.

Different types of activities take place at each workshop. Some include quiet activities like drawing, writing and coloring. Some involve activities can be somewhat physical. All activities have an environment theme. Project Wild workshops are available to anyone who works with children. Educators who complete the workshops earn 6 hours TEA-approved CPE and TEEAC Credit.

Find upcoming workshops in the calendar section of the Texas Parks and Wildlife website.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our show.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti

Back to School Week: Outdoor Adventures

Friday, August 10th, 2018

Learning orienteering with Texas Outdoors Tomorrow’s Outdoor Adventures Education programs

This is Passport to Texas Back to School Week

The Outdoors Tomorrow Foundation partners with Texas Parks and Wildlife to bring Outdoor Adventures Education to middle and high school students.

We promote the outdoor adventures education program across the United States, and primarily in Texas.

Scot McClure is Education Director for the organization.

There’s not another curriculum like it in the entire United States. Although our program has expanded beyond Texas, we are primarily a Texas Parks and Wildlife education program.

The Outdoor Adventures course offers one or two semesters of daily lesson plans that may include Angler Education, Boater Education and Hunter Education. Students who complete these classes earn certification. There’s also Dutch oven cooking, orienteering and more. McClure says these classes count as physical education.

Any student can take this class as a PE class if the school offers it. Every school in the state of Texas can offer Outdoor Adventures. It is 100% available to every single student in Texas. If their local school doesn’t have Outdoor Adventures, then they need to find the right decision-maker; maybe it’s the principal, maybe it’s the curriculum coordinator, or the school board. And say: We want Outdoor adventures in our school so our children can learn these skills and enjoy them [for a lifetime].

Find a link for the Outdoors Tomorrow Foundation at passporttotexas.org.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Back to School Week: Aquatic Science

Thursday, August 9th, 2018

Texas Aquatic Science Teacher Handbook

This is Passport to Texas Back to School Week

Of all the things that students study this year when they return to the classroom, Texas Aquatic Science may be among the most important.

Texas aquatic science is the study of anything aquatic. Whether it be the habitat, the plants, or the animals that live in it.

Melissa Alderson is the conservation education manager with Texas Parks and Wildlife. For most living things, water is life.

So, it’s really important that we look at water as a resource and protect the water that we have here.

Melissa and her team train middle school and high school teachers in this hands-on aquatic science curriculum. Educators impart the information to students both in the classroom and in the field.

And if they don’t have any water in their backyard, they can always contact a certified field site. Those are agencies that have programs that do water quality monitoring, watershed activities…where they can take a field trip to do Texas aquatic science.

The benefits of Texas aquatic science curriculum are far reaching.

If we get the kids, at a young age, to protect those resources through science investigations, games, models, internet projects, then when they get older, they’re going to be the ambassadors for the water here in Texas.

Bring Texas Aquatic Science to your classroom; learn how when you click the Education tab on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program Supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Back to School Week: Texas Children in Nature

Wednesday, August 8th, 2018

Children connecting with nature. Image: www.texaschildreninnature.org

This is Passport to Texas Back to School Week

Richard Louv coined the term “Nature Deficit Disorder” in his 2006 book, Last Child in the Woods. Three years later, the Children in Nature Network formed.

And the real work began: to reconnect children and families with nature around the state.

Jennifer Bristol coordinates the Texas Children in Nature program at Texas Parks and Wildlife.

We work with over 500 partner organizations to look at how does the education, the conservation, the built environment, the faith communities, the different youth development communities, health community—all work in tandem to make sure that we are doing our very best to connect more children and families with nature.

Children spend between 7 and 11 hours indoors with media. Health experts attribute this sedentary lifestyle to a rise in childhood obesity and behavior issues.

When they’re not connected with nature, those things are more prevalent. Versus if they’re outdoors and they’re active and they’re enjoying playing in nature—those are healthy life choices that stick with them for their entire life.

Teachers can help improve the future of our youth.

What I talk to teachers about all the time is any lesson can be taught outdoors. It’s very beneficial; they’re more engaged while they’re out there. And most teachers that take that step out the door see good results.

Find classroom resources on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website—click the Education tab. And, the Nature Rocks Texas website points families to nearby nature-based activities.

Our series receives support from RAM Trucks; built to serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.