Archive for the 'TPWD TV' Category

TPW TV — Fishing Hall of Fame

Friday, December 7th, 2018

The man. The legend: Shannon Tompkins

This is Passport to Texas

You never know where a shared family experience will lead down the road. In Shannon Tompkins case, it lead him to a love of fishing, avocation as a conservationist and a career as an outdoor writer.

Ya know, I’m lucky I grew up in a family that loved to fish. The memories I have is of me and my brother fishing in farm ponds of east Texas. It’s just always been a part of my life. This is the same country my great, great, great grandfather saw. I’m looking at the same water, catching the same fish that he caught. I write about issues related to fisheries and water; the environment. Because without a healthy environment, we don’t have fish. And so people don’t care about something that they don’t feel a connection to. If they don’t know about this place, they don’t know what’s at stake, they don’t care that they’ve lost it. That’s really been my goal is to let folks know what’s going on out there.

For his dedication to conservation issues, Tompkins, who writes for the Houston Chronicle, was inducted into the Texas freshwater fishing hall of fame. Texas Parks and Wildlife Executive director, Carter Smith.

He brings a very thoughtful, objective voice, of fish and wildlife management or conservation and outdoor recreation in Texas, and Shannon Tompkins is there to tell that story.

Learn more about Tompkins from the people who know him the week of December 9th on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS.

Out show receives support from RAM Trucks: Built to serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV — The Lake Maker

Monday, December 3rd, 2018
Lake Wichita

Lake Wichita

This is Passport

When Tom Lang, the Texas Parks and Wildlife District Fisheries Supervisor in Wichita Falls, took over his position eight years ago…

Eight of the lakes in this district had completely died up. And one of those was here at lake Wichita. This is the third oldest lake in the state of Texas.

Lang manages fisheries resources for eight counties in North Texas. Lake Wichita offered a challenge.

We’re starting a lake over. So we�re going to drain the water, the little bit of water that’s in it, and we’re going to dig it out and double the storage capacity.

The plan is comprehensive, and includes amenities like bike paths. A project of this scale requires community support. Lang developed relationships that helped to raise more than 4-million dollars for the project.

A project of this magnitude is expensive. And to have the community that we have here and the resources that we�ve been able to have, to be able to get the ball rolling on those, has really been important and very special.

Local business man Steven “Reno” Gustafason is optimistic about the future of Lake Wichita. He says the plan means decades of benefit to the community.

Tom’s plan is to bring back the fish, to bring back people coming to the lakes to go boating, people that will come and ride
their bikes on the bike trail. Just enjoy the lake like we did.

See this work in progress this week on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS.

We receive support from RAM Trucks: built to serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV – Up on the (Green) Roof

Friday, November 16th, 2018
Austin Central Library rooftop garden.

Austin Central Library rooftop garden.

This is Passport to Texas

The new public library in Austin is an oasis in the midst of a steel and concrete desert.

[opens w/ambience] This is the, uh, rooftop garden, which we also call the butterfly garden.

John Gillum is library facilities manager. Native plants sway in the breeze six stories above busy thoroughfares.

It is a green roof. It means a roof that’s actually landscaped. We wanted to do something to help out our little pollinators. We will do anything we can to attract them. If we can come up with different plants we think will draw more butterflies, we’ll do it.

An oasis of native plants help bees and butterflies make their way through increasingly urban landscapes. It also makes for a nice spot to sit and read.

This is really the best part of the library as far as a natural setting to sit in.

Putting a park on a building saves space and lowers energy costs when temperatures soar.

As opposed to the concrete around us, this is going to be an area that really absorbs heat rather than reflects it out, so even in the kind of summers that we get here in Austin, this is still going to be a pretty pleasant place to be.

Can’t get to the library? Then get to a television. Explore the Austin Central Library rooftop garden on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS, the week of November 25th.

In an age when news about nature is not always cheery, look for some good news on the top shelf of Austin’s new library.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV — Billingsley Ranch

Friday, November 2nd, 2018

Billingsley Ranch

This is Passport to Texas

The Billingsley Ranch in the Trans-Pecos is made up of pristine Chihuahuan dessert grassland. Shortly after buying the ranch in 2008, Stuart Sasser said a wildfire set him back to square one.

And it came up through here and burned about seventy percent of this ranch. We were able then to start completely over with a new set of fences that were antelope friendly type fences.  And build a new type of water system.

In an upcoming segment on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series, viewers see the ranch and meet, Sasser: a 2018 Lone Star Land Steward Award recipient. Michael Sullins is a Natural Resource Specialist with Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Stuart’s approach to management out here is not really all from a cattle production perspective. He has a holistic view of the place; he wants to improve it for the native wildlife.

Whitney Gann is a Research Scientist with Borderlands Research Institute. She says the ranch’s prime grassland habitat made it an ideal place to translocate pronghorn.

We’ve completed seven translocations since 2011, the Hughes Sasser ranch served as our release sight for pronghorn in 2016, and the results of these translocations is an upturn in the population, and so we’ve actually doubled our population size since 2012 to today.

A segment featuring innovations on the Billingsley Ranch airs the week of November 4 on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV show on PBS.

The Wildlife Restoration program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV — Hunters Welcome

Friday, October 12th, 2018

TPW TV- Opening weekend of hunting season in small town Texas.

This is Passport to Texas

The week of October 21, Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series captures the excitement of deer season opening weekend; series producer, Don Cash.

We sent a lot of producers to Goldthwaite, Texas for the opening weekend of deer season. We follow a young deer hunter who lives in Goldthwaite; we spend some time at a processing facility–people bringing their deer in. We take a look at some of the businesses, restaurants and  different places in Goldthwaite that look forward to the opening weekend of deer season because it’s good for them financially. So, this is
something we’ve talked about for years–being able to show people the economic impact of hunting. I think it’s going to be kind of interesting, actually.

Cash said, his team could not have achieved this feat without the kind and enthusiastic support of the people of Goldthwaite.

A gentleman named Warren Blesh who’s the President of the Simms Creek Wildlife Management Association went out of his way, and the people of Goldthwaite went out of their way, to help us find people to tell their stories. And really cleared the way for us to come in and run wild with our cameras. And, we showed up with our cameras, and people were pretty excited about us coming in to tell the story of what goes on in a small town in Texas when hunting season rolls around.

See this show the week of October 21 on PBS; check your local listings.

The Wildlife restoration program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.