Archive for the 'TPWD TV' Category

TPW TV– The Oyster Grind

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019
Gulf oysters in repose.

Gulf oysters in repose.

This is Passport to Texas

Texas reefs once held what seemed like an endless supply of oysters. But times have changed. Over the years the daily sack limits have been cut back.

It used to be a hundred and fifty sack a day.

Mauricio Blanco has been an oysterman in Lavaca Bay for 30 years.

Now it’s went down from one hundred and fifty sacks to ninety sacks, and then from ninety sacks, they went down to fifty sacks; this year the state limit is thirty sacks. So, every year we getting less, and less, and less. And the bad part is that fuel, it don’t go down, it goes up and up. But like right now, we probably going to make twenty sacks all day long. Maybe.

In a Texas Parks and Wildlife TV segment that airs the week of May 26, viewers visit the coast where a section of Galveston Bay receives much-needed TLC in the form of new reef bottom. Bill Rodney is a Natural Resource specialist with Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Recent science has indicated that most oyster reefs are operating right on the border of sustainability. Everybody realizes that something needs to be done. The key to restoring the habitat is putting fresh cultch out there, cultch can be any materials that oysters can grow on.

Witness the rebirth of an oyster reef and the measures taken to ensure the success of the resource and those who depend on it…on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series, the week of May 26 on PBS. Check your local listings.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV– Natural Connection

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

Xochitl Rodriguez and Adrian Sabom.

This is Passport to Texas

The outdoors brings people together, as it did Xochit Rodriguez and Adrian Sabom. Xochit grew up in El Paso; the Franklin Mountains were her backyard. Adrien grew up hunting on her family’s south Texas Ranch.

[Xochitl Rodriguez] Adrian and I met at a Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation event.
[Adrian Sabom] I met Xochitl at the We Will Not Be Tamed campaign launch party, and we were talking about, well she has never shot a gun and I had never hiked the Franklin Mountains, and so it evolved into, we should each do each other’s thing.

Each woman visited the other on her home turf. Xochit ‘s visit to Adrian’s ranch started with a horseback ride.

[Adrian Sabom] After horseback riding, we went to the big event…
[Xochitl Rodriguez] The moment we’ve all been waiting for.
[Adrian Sabom] Xochit shooting a gun for the first time.
[Xochitl Rodriguez] This is the craziest thing I’ve ever done. I was really, really scared.
[Adrian Sabom] She was super nervous in the beginning. You could tell her hands were shaking, she was sweating.
[Xochitl Rodriguez] I shook after every clay, but then I finally got into the groove and felt a little bit better.

Share the full experience of both women when you tune into the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV show on PBS the week of May 12.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

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TPW TV–Green Jay Study in Rio Grande Valley

Thursday, April 11th, 2019
Green Jay

Green Jay

This is Passport to Texas

A new study in South Texas focuses on the Green Jay.

We don’t know a lot about green jays, first of all, so it’s important to know what they’re doing, if we want to be able to manage for them, and we want to manage for them because we have a lot of birdwatchers that come into the Valley and one of the species that they really want to see are green jays.

Tony Henehan is a Wildlife Biologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The Green Jay occurs from South America, north to Texas.

The Rio Grande Valley is, I think, the third fastest growing urban area in the country. It’s expanding at a rapid rate. A lot of urbanization, a lot of habitat change is going on, and so these birds have been able to adapt to a certain extent.

To understand how Green Jays are adapting to the rapidly changing environment of The Valley, Tony plans to trap, tag and track up to ten birds a year. RGV resident, Donna McCowan let Tony place a trap in her backyard.

Well, Tony brought this cage to me about a week and a half ago and had me set it up here under the shade. With the cage door open we were putting corn and peanuts in it, so the birds would get used to it and just assume it’s supposed to be there, and they had no problem with getting in and out of it. This morning, we’re going close the top of it and watch and wait for the birds to show up.

Find out if Tony and Donna trapped a Green Jay when you watch the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS the week of April 14.

The Wildlife Restoration Program Supports our Series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV–Blanco River Recovery

Thursday, March 7th, 2019

TPWD TV week of March 10, 2019

This is Passport to Texas

When a forty-foot wall of water thundered down the Blanco River on Memorial Day weekend of 2015, it claimed 13 lives, destroyed hundreds of homes, and ravaged the land along the banks. The recovery process for humans and nature continues.

The flood of 2015 caused massive devastation to the Blanco River landscape, there was a loss of a lot of vegetation, a lot of trees, a lot of soil scour, and what we see here is an eco-system in recovery.

Ryan McGillicuddy is a Texas Parks and Wildlife conservation ecologist with Inland Fisheries.

Healthy native stream-side vegetation provides a number of ecological functions including bank stability, because its roots are deep and strong.  It also provides a water quality function by filtering run-off and pollutants, but also, importantly, this healthy stream-side vegetation is also an extreme benefit to our fish and wildlife populations.

Healthy stream-side vegetation benefits our fish and wildlife populations, including the Guadalupe Bass. At one time this fish had been pushed completely out of the Blanco River system by non-native small mouth bass. But through management and restocking, it’s rebounding.

We’ve been able to document that the fish that we’ve stocked are now reproducing in the wild, so it’s been a pretty remarkable success story.

Experience the story of the recovery of a community, a river and wildlife on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series the week of March 10 on PBS.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV: Mustang Island, Fun for the Family

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

Searching for shells on the beach at Mustang Island.

This is Passport to Texas

Are you thinking about a coastal getaway with the family this summer, but wondering where to go? The Texas Parks and Wildlife Television PBS series takes you to an island retreat that offers recreation and relaxation for the whole family. Producer Abe Moore.

As a producer and a dad, I’m always looking for stories or places where it’s kid friendly, or something great for the family. And Mustang Island, it’s just a great place for kids, and then as a parent, you can kind of just hang out.

People, when they come out to the island, they’re looking for relaxation. So, the minute they get here and get set up, that’s all they’re looking to do—just sit back, relax and take it at their own pace.

It’s also a great place for fishing, and beach combing and birding. When I was out there filming, there was a lot of kite surfing going on, so that was really cool. What’s really nice about it, it’s right there in the central part of the coast.

In Texas, I don’t think a lot of people realize within hours you can be here. And when you sit out in this breeze coming off the water, it’s just great. So that’s story’s going to be on Texas Parks and Wildlife television. Enjoy!

The Texas Parks and Wildlife TV segment airs the week of February 17 on PBS stations. Check your local listings.

We receive support from RAM Trucks: Built to Serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.