Archive for the 'TPWD TV' Category

TPW TV: Coastal “Parkitecture”

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

UT School of design on TPW TV.

This is Passport to Texas

A dozen UT Austin Architecture students and their professor spent a long, hot summer on Galveston Island SP.

We’re getting a Master’s in Architecture but we’re getting a Ph.D. in craft supplies. It’s been like Santa’s little workshop in here.

That’s because, as student Hugo Reynolds tells it, they spent hours at craft stores buying supplies to build various models for their project. Coleman Coker is the Director of Design Lab at the UT Austin School of Architecture.

This is a project we have to do in a very short time. Ten weeks from the first day to the last day. It will be an interesting summer for these students.

Working closely with park rangers, the students’ assignment is to design and build a new educational pavilion for the park, which also provides some of the only shade on the park’s bay side.

They’ll be camping very close to where they’re going to build. It gets them immersed in the climate they’re going to be working within. The mission of the Design Lab is to try to increase ecological literacy, particularly of the coastal environment.

Watch the process this week on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS. Check your local listings.

We receive support in part from RAM Trucks: Built to Serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV: Educating the Educators

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019
Project Wild

Project Wild

This is Passport to Texas

On any given Saturday, someone in Texas is probably getting trained in Project Wild. Kiki Corey oversees the program for Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Project WILD is professional development for educators to help them teach about wildlife and wildlife issues.

Susan Campbell, Education Coordinator for the San Antonio Natural area, says Project WILD isn’t jut about learning the science of nature.

[Susan] You can also teach literacy, you can teach mathematics, you can teach social studies.

[Kiki] The Project WILD activities are experience-based. Regardless of the level of your students, everyone in the class will have shared the same experience with the content and then the teacher has something to work from.

See Project WILD in action on the TPW TV series.

The bear went over the mountain. The bear went over the mountain. The bear went over the mountain. He ate the fish on the mountain, as much as he could eat.

Watch Educating the Educators, the week of June 23, on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS. Check your local listings.

Out series receives support in part from RAM Trucks: Built to Serve.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV: Billy Hassell and the Art of Conservation

Thursday, June 13th, 2019
Billy Hassell's Powderhorn Ranch

Billy Hassell’s Powderhorn Ranch

This is Passport to Texas

Billy Hassell lives in the urban world of Fort Worth; yet, he’s always been drawn to the natural world.

Reconnecting with nature in a small way, in a very urban environment… it calms the soul somehow if you can slow down. We live fast-paced lives and we’re kind of conditioned, I think, to believe we have to live in rush all the time.

He doesn’t rush, but he does brush. Billy’s a full-time artist who focuses on nature.

My work has always been inspired by nature. I grew up in a time when there were still some open spaces and creeks and I got to experience a little bit of nature even though I grew up in a pretty urban environment. I guess my love of nature was born from those experiences, and I’ve been kind of searching for that throughout the rest of my life. I’ve been seeking out opportunities to be out in nature and find places to inspire my work.

And inspiration is all around. He recently found it at Powderhorn Ranch.

I find a lot of inspiration as an artist in a place like this, and as I learn more and more about it, I’m fascinated by the complexities of it and how practically every plant and every little creature plays a role in the overall balance of a place.

See Billy Hassell and his art in a segment of the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series on PBS the week of June 16. Check your local listings.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV– The Oyster Grind

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019
Gulf oysters in repose.

Gulf oysters in repose.

This is Passport to Texas

Texas reefs once held what seemed like an endless supply of oysters. But times have changed. Over the years the daily sack limits have been cut back.

It used to be a hundred and fifty sack a day.

Mauricio Blanco has been an oysterman in Lavaca Bay for 30 years.

Now it’s went down from one hundred and fifty sacks to ninety sacks, and then from ninety sacks, they went down to fifty sacks; this year the state limit is thirty sacks. So, every year we getting less, and less, and less. And the bad part is that fuel, it don’t go down, it goes up and up. But like right now, we probably going to make twenty sacks all day long. Maybe.

In a Texas Parks and Wildlife TV segment that airs the week of May 26, viewers visit the coast where a section of Galveston Bay receives much-needed TLC in the form of new reef bottom. Bill Rodney is a Natural Resource specialist with Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Recent science has indicated that most oyster reefs are operating right on the border of sustainability. Everybody realizes that something needs to be done. The key to restoring the habitat is putting fresh cultch out there, cultch can be any materials that oysters can grow on.

Witness the rebirth of an oyster reef and the measures taken to ensure the success of the resource and those who depend on it…on the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV series, the week of May 26 on PBS. Check your local listings.

The Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW TV– Natural Connection

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

Xochitl Rodriguez and Adrian Sabom.

This is Passport to Texas

The outdoors brings people together, as it did Xochit Rodriguez and Adrian Sabom. Xochit grew up in El Paso; the Franklin Mountains were her backyard. Adrien grew up hunting on her family’s south Texas Ranch.

[Xochitl Rodriguez] Adrian and I met at a Texas Parks and Wildlife Foundation event.
[Adrian Sabom] I met Xochitl at the We Will Not Be Tamed campaign launch party, and we were talking about, well she has never shot a gun and I had never hiked the Franklin Mountains, and so it evolved into, we should each do each other’s thing.

Each woman visited the other on her home turf. Xochit ‘s visit to Adrian’s ranch started with a horseback ride.

[Adrian Sabom] After horseback riding, we went to the big event…
[Xochitl Rodriguez] The moment we’ve all been waiting for.
[Adrian Sabom] Xochit shooting a gun for the first time.
[Xochitl Rodriguez] This is the craziest thing I’ve ever done. I was really, really scared.
[Adrian Sabom] She was super nervous in the beginning. You could tell her hands were shaking, she was sweating.
[Xochitl Rodriguez] I shook after every clay, but then I finally got into the groove and felt a little bit better.

Share the full experience of both women when you tune into the Texas Parks and Wildlife TV show on PBS the week of May 12.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

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