Archive for the 'TPW Mag' Category

TPW Magazine – Hueco Rock Rodeo

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017
Bouldering at Hueco Tanks State Park. Image: Brandon Jacobeit.

Bouldering at Hueco Tanks State Park. Image: Brandon Jakobeit.

This is Passport to Texas

The January 2018 issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine, features a story about the Hueco Rock Rodeo by Russell Roe.

The Hueco Tanks Rock Rodeo is a bouldering competition they hold every year at Hueco Tanks State Park outside El Paso. And it is the top bouldering competition in the nation, if not the world.

During four days in February, competitors cling to and climb boulders and small cliffs using nothing but their hands and feet.

Bouldering may lack the drama of scaling a high peak. The climbers are drawn to it because of the purity of the climbing and the powerful, graceful moves required, and the mental challenge of finding the best way to the top.

Climbers spot… and cheer on one another. Some climbs find competitors seemingly defying gravity.

At Hueco Tanks, they’re really kind of finding the steepest thing they can climb. Which is often the roof of a cave. They’re moving horizontally across the ground—holding on by their feet and their hands. And, it goers seem like it defies gravity.

Look for Russell Roe’s Hueco Rock Rodeo story in the January issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine.

The history of Hueco Tanks, concerning bouldering, is so rich. And this competition celebrates bouldering and celebrates Hueco Tanks’ history, and the development of that sport.

That’s our show… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine – Featuring Epic Texas Challenges

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017
Texas Water Safari. image: TPW TV Series

Texas Water Safari. Image: TPW TV Series

This is Passport to Texas

Expect months of action-packed stories in Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

We have chosen as our theme for 2018: the year of epic Texas challenges.

Editor, Louie Bond. And just what are epic Texas challenges?

The biggest. The best. The most. The fastest. Whatever hyperbole you can come up with… You know, Texans love to brag [good natured] and challenge each other. So. We’re going to play on that Texas spirit all year long.

Louie said the challenges align with the Texas Parks and Wildlife mission.

We thought about all of the things that we love to write about in the magazine, and we started looking at all the events that happen in Texas. We figured there was no way to make it all match up month-for-month with our publication. But you know the magic that happens. We found all the different categories and were able to place one in each month of the magazine. So, it just worked out perfectly.

In 2018, readers will paddle to the coast during the Texas Water Safari, bag big deer at the Muy Grande deer contest, push personal limits during the Howl at the Moon Relay, and hang on for dear life at the Hueco Tanks Rock Rodeo and more.

One thing readers might like to know is that if one particular month doesn’t please them—each month is totally different. So, I hope that they hang on for an issue that piques their curiosity.

The latest issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now.

That’s our show… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine’s Rio Grande Valley Road Trip

Thursday, November 16th, 2017
Bentsen Rio Grande Valley State Park

Bentsen Rio Grande Valley State Park

This is Passport to Texas

To celebrate its 75th anniversary, Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine’s staff spent a week in the Rio Grande Valley to discover its stories.

It’s the craziest thing we’ve ever done. But, sometimes crazy is brilliant. And I’m hoping that’s the case here.

Editor, Louie Bond, says the issue is a tribute to the folks who started the magazine 75 years ago in the midst of a world war.

And we thought about, what part of the state of Texas could we celebrate that embodies the spirit of Texas, and the multi-culturalism, and fantastic nature opportunities? And we unanimously agreed the Rio Grande Valley was the place to go.

Their inspiration came from an old issue of Norwegian Airlines magazine.

Who had taken the entire team to the most northern location that they fly to in Norway—which was actually a tiny little town within the Arctic Circle. But, for such a tiny town, a whole magazine was devoted to it, and it was the most fascinating thing I had ever seen.

In the end, Louie Bond says the December issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is a love letter.

We call is a love letter to the Rio Grande Valley. And that’s what I would like everyone to take away from it. You know, to look at the Rio Grande Valley through the eyes of a new visitor, who looks around and says: “’Wow. I cannot believe what I found here.’

The December issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine is on newsstands now. Our show receives funding from Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine — Nature Play

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017
Children with dip  nets in woods at outdoor family workshop in Georgetown near Austin. Image from Texas Children in Nature

Children with dip nets in woods at outdoor family workshop in Georgetown near Austin. Image from Texas Children in Nature

This is Passport to Texas

While all play benefits children, experts agree that nature play is best. Yet, we’ve seen kids disconnect from it.

And that disconnect has resulted in a myriad of different health issues, wellness issues – and then even [affects] becoming the next stewards to take care of our natural spaces and wild things.

Jennifer Bristol coordinates the Children in Nature program. The concept of nature play isn’t new, but the collaboration to ensure children have access to it via a “playground” experience is.

Landscape architects, the childhood development people, and the playground designers all came together and said: ‘Okay, let’s create this space where children can interact with nature, but on a much smaller scale.’

Bristol said studies showed parents like playgrounds because they exist within defined boundaries, and parents can keep an eye on their kids.

Looking at that concept, the playground designer said, ‘Okay, let’s validate what the parents are feeling and that they need, but let’s make the elements that they’re playing with out of natural materials. Or, replicate things that they would find in nature, and use those to help them grow, develop their gross motor skills, problem solve, and then all the other elements when children actually are being active and playing in the outdoors.’

Jennifer Bristol wrote an article about the growth of Nature Play in Texas for the July issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

The NatureRocksTexas.org website lists all the parks, nature centers and activities where you can play, explore and connect with nature near you.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Middle of Nowhere and Everywhere

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017
Grand Prairie Paddling Trail

Photo: City of Grand Prairie Parks and Recreation Department

This is Passport to Texas

Photo-journalist Camille Wheeler discovered five urban jungles teaming with wildlife when she kayaked along their paddling trails.

I had this romantic notion that I was going to do all five of these trails by myself. I actually did do two of them by myself. [But] I actually wound up having the best time on the three trails that I did with groups.

She kayaked and in Fort Worth, Grand Prairie, Houston, San Antonio and Pasadena…and wrote about it for the March issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine.

I felt like an explorer even in the middle of a group. I went out with the assurance that these paddling trails had been mapped and surveyed by a Texas Parks and Wildlife team. But, there was this sense of adventure traveling these waterways that were new to me.

Camille saw birds, fish, insects, and even alligators—all in the middle of densely populated urban areas. She says urban paddling trails offer close-in outdoor opportunities.

People like me can get our feet wet here in these urban areas, on these trails that are very safe and easy. And now that I have had a little bit of experience, and some very good guidance—my heart is beating fast at the thought of going back to these same trails that I’ve already traveled, and then going out a little bit farther and a little bit more into the country. And rekindling this love affair with water that is new for a middle-aged woman.

You’re never too old to experience something new. Read Camille Wheeler’s article, Gently Down the Stream, in the March issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

The Sport Fish restoration program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.