Archive for the 'Fishing' Category

A Year of Outdoor Adventures

Wednesday, September 7th, 2016
You could be saltwater fishing in Matagorda Bay.

You could be saltwater fishing in Matagorda Bay.

This is Passport to Texas

What if someone gave you a year’s worth of outdoor adventures? It could happen for one fishing or hunting license buyer when they enter the Win Your Dream Year Outdoors drawing, through November 30.

Go to a special web page that we’ve set up and enter your information: your email address, your name, and your customer number and you’re entered.

It’s free to enter the drawing. Guided fishing and hunting trips are just the start. Janis Johnson, with Texas Parks and Wildlife, says priceless outdoor experiences will provide a lifetime of memories for the winner.

We’re also giving these one of a kind experiences that money can’t buy. You can’t buy a trip to go out on a bay troll on a research vessel with a coastal biologist. Or to go longline sampling in the Gulf of Mexico to learn more about the bay systems and how we keep them healthy and thriving. And, you cannot at this point, buy a kayak fishing adventure with a team of TPW biologists on the Devil’s River, which is one of the most pristine and beautiful and untouched rivers in the whole Southwestern United States.

The license buyer who wins the Grand Prize also receives a premier dove hunting trip, a shotgun, a trophy catfish trip, and $2,000 in Cabela’s merchandise and gear, and more—and it’s all tax free.

And here’s another exciting point. Every trip is for at least two people with accommodations for the travelers.

Find details about the Win Your Dream Year Outdoors drawing on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website, search using the phrase “Dream Year”.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Your Dream Year Outdoors

Tuesday, September 6th, 2016
Win your dream year outdoors with Texas Parks and Wildlife.

Win your dream year outdoors with Texas Parks and Wildlife.

This is Passport to Texas

Most folks who work indoors all day long wish they had more time to be outdoors.

We can’t give them more time outdoors, but we can certainly make it a lot more fun when they’re out there.

That’s Janis Johnson with Texas Parks and Wildlife. She says anyone purchasing an annual, combo or lifetime license can enter a free drawing for a Dream Year Outdoors.

And the way you enter is to buy your license either online or at a local retailer—get your customer number off of your license, and simply go to a special web page that we’ve set up on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website and enter your information.

So what would this dream year outdoors look like?

It starts with a Cabela’s Celebrity Bass Trip, where you get to go fishing with two of their TV hosts. And this will be televised and shown nationally. There are five fishing trips; a saltwater trip—guided. There’s a freshwater trip. There’s a Devil’s River Kayak Fishing Adventure. There’s a Be a Coastal Biologist for a Day fishing trip. There’s a dove hunting trip from a premier outfitter. And all of these trips include hotel lodging.

The Win Your Dream Year Outdoors drawing runs through November 30. A winner will be drawn December 1.

Janis Johnson returns with additional details on the drawing for a Dream Year Outdoors tomorrow.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Helping Veterans and Hungry Texans

Friday, September 2nd, 2016
You can help support Hunters for the Hungry and Fund for Veterans at the time you buy a hunting or fishing license.

You can help support Hunters for the Hungry and Fund for Veterans at the time you buy a hunting or fishing license.

This is Passport to Texas

Now, whenever Texas hunters and anglers buy a new license, they have an opportunity to voluntarily make a charitable donation to two different non-profits.

You can make the voluntary contribution of either one dollar, five dollars, ten dollars or twenty dollars to either the Fund for Veteran’s Assistance, or to help feed Texas families with a donation to Hunters for the Hungry.

Justin Halvorsen is revenue director at Texas Parks and Wildlife. This new giving opportunity came about through passage of SB 1978 and HB 1584 by the Texas Legislature.

It’s through any one of our sales channels. Either online, over the phone, at a retail agent, or any one of our parks and wildlife locations.

Halvorsen says if you make a donation, your bill at checkout will naturally go up by that amount.

And then, at the end of every month, it’ll go into a separate pot, and we’ll send it along to those respective entities [nonprofits].

If you’re feeling generous, you can donate to both. Of course you may wonder if your donation is tax deductible.

That is a great question. And there will be a receipt that gets printed as part of this that specifically says that this is a donation to the Veteran’s Fund or Hunters for the Hungry. And then, really, it’s up to the individual and their tax preparer to make that ultimate decision.

You may need to ask for an itemized receipt from retailers. Find additional details on the TPW website.

That’s our show… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Leasing Land for Angler Access

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016
Here's what river access can get you.

Here’s what river access can get you.

This is Passport to Texas

Texas Parks and Wildlife has expanded angler access to some of the state’s 191-thousand miles of rivers through a lease program.

We’re trying to bring in private landowners to help be a solution to open up angler access to rivers.

Tim Birdsong is chief of habitat conservation for Texas Parks and wildlife. Landowners who participate in the program receive monthly lease payments and even funds for site improvements.

Such as trails, or parking areas. If there’s an interest, we support habitat improvements…addressing, sometimes, erosion issues, or maybe loss of vegetation along the stream bank that’s resulting in some kind of bank instability. So, there are a lot of things we can do at these sites to help benefit not just their general management of the site, but also provide for a better user experience.

Birdsong says users ought not to expect a family-friendly parklike setting.

This is more about showcasing a natural, functional, healthy river system. This is for folks that are experienced paddlers, and anglers that really know how to [navigate and] fish a river. Rivers are inherently dangerous and somewhat unforgiving. But we do want to provide an opportunity for people to experience what a natural, flowing river is.

Find more information about the program and river ecosystems on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Landowners Key to River Access for Angling

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016
Landowners are the key to river access for angling in Texas.

Landowners are the key to river access for angling in Texas.

This is Passport to Texas

As 95-percent of Texas land is privately owned, angler access to rivers is challenging.

Our laws are such that many of the larger rives in the state are publicly navigable, so anglers—the public—have a right to recreate in those river segments. But, accessing those rivers is very difficult, because you have to cross land; often that land is under private ownership.

Tim Birdsong is chief of habitat conservation for Texas Parks and wildlife. Through leases with landowners, Texas Parks and Wildlife has expanded angler access along the 191-thousand miles of rivers in Texas.

The program is intended to be a win-win scenario for landowners and for anglers. If they have a property that’s a good fit, and really does expand bank, wade and kayak fishing in the state, and they’re interested in making some money off of that, then what they do is participate in this lease program. We provide some funds for a monthly lease payment. We also provide funding for site improvements such as trails or parking areas. If there’s an interest, we will support habitat improvements.

Angler access improvements in Texas are funded primarily through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program.

Find additional information about angler river access and how to get involved in the program on the Texas Parks and Wildlife website.

The Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.