Archive for the 'Shooting' Category

Texas Brigades Inspire Careers

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017
Bobwhite Brigade Cadets. Image: Texasbrigades.org

Bobwhite Brigade Cadets. Image: Texasbrigades.org

This is Passport to Texas

To categorize the Texas Brigades as “summer camp” is like calling a mountain lion “a kitty cat”.

This is not a normal summer camp. This is meant to be a lot more than that.

Writer, Aubry Buzek wrote a story about the Brigades for the October  issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

The editor of the magazine said, I want you to go to this summer camp and write about it. And I was thinking: Okay. There’s going to be fun stuff happening; I get there and it’s in the middle of a session on how conservation groups work in Texas….and conservation and hunters ethics. And I was like, Whoa!

The 5-day, cell-phone free, camps for youth build confidence and camaraderie with projects, public speaking and debates on conservation issues.

There are some really amazing instructors who come to this camp. There are instructors there who are wildlife biologists from Texas Parks and Wildlife, other private hunting ranches, water control authorities…just the gambit of [conservation] organizations in Texas. The kids get to meet people not easily accessible. Every instructor that I talked to said that they want these kids to pick up the phone and keep in touch with them. They want to help them grow now and into the future.

Aubry Buzek’s story on the Texas Brigades appears in the October issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

The Wildlife Restoration program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

TPW Magazine — Texas Brigades

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017
Learning conservation with Texas Brigades.

Learning conservation with Texas Brigades.

This is Passport to Texas

Texas Brigades is a wildlife and natural resource focused leadership development program for youth, 13 to 17.

Texas Brigades has been around for 25 years. It started out as Bobwhite Brigade back in 1993, and then it just kind of morphed.

It’s morphed into is eight summer camps, each with a different conservation focus. Aubry Buzek [Byu-zik] wrote about the Brigades for the October issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

What was really interesting is that these camps are not necessarily about learning about one particular species. At Bobwhite Brigade, they were learning a lot about quail—and they had biologists there teaching them about quail. But that wasn’t the overall goal of the program. It was about being comfortable with public speaking, comfortable talking with their peers. Debating.

These five-day intensive camps incorporate military marching and cadence, and introduce students to experts and activities that challenge and

I talked to a lot of parents after graduation and they were like, ‘Who is this kid?’ I saw it too. That confidence. A lot of parents said they didn’t expect their kid to know just so much. But, in addition to that knowledge, these kids are loud, and they’re marching, and they make a lot of friends. It really is a transformative camp.

Read Aubry Buzek’s story about the Texas Brigades in the October issue of Texas Parks and Wildlife magazine.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Operation Game Thief Clay Stoppers Shootout

Monday, September 12th, 2016
Operation Game Thief Clay Stoppers Shootout

Operation Game Thief Clay Stoppers Shootout

This is Passport to Texas

Operation Game Thief Texas belong to the International Wildlife Crime-Stoppers Association.

And I’m proud to say Texas is the leader. Texas leads because of the way we’re structured and the way we operate. Texas offers cash rewards up to a thousand dollars for information leading to arrests and convictions.

Lt. Lewis Rather oversees Operation Game Thief. Generous public support provides money for rewards and education.

We have 14 information and educational. We’re very lucky in Texas, and so we’re very thankful to have the program.

September 23 a fundraiser—Operation Game Thief Alamo Area Clay Stoppers Shootout—takes place in San Antonio. Teams and individuals take aim to raise money for Operation Game Thief.

We have a lot of fun down there. You can come and shoot, and if you’re a top winner, you can win a lifetime hunting and fishing license from Parks and Wildlife. We have great auction items. Raffle items. A great lunch provided by OGT board member, Jimmy Hasslocher. We have a lot of 4-H youth teams coming to shoot. A lot of our paralyzed veterans and wounded warrior teams are coming to shoot. So, it’s going to be a big event. And if you have a chance, come out and support what Game Wardens do for Texas, for wildlife, for all of us.

Find complete registration details for the September 23 fundraiser—Clay Stoppers Shootout Alamo Area Clay Stoppers Shootout—at www.ogttx.org

That’s our show… Funding provided in part by Ram Trucks. Guts. Glory. Ram

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Shooting Sporting Clays

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016
Ready for a day of shooting at clay pigeons.

Ready for a day of shooting at clay pigeons.


This is Passport to Texas

Sporting clays came to the US from Britain in the 1960s and gained a fast following; one that continues to grow—especially in Texas.

Texas is the Mecca of the clay target sports.

San Antonio is home to the National Sporting Clays Association and the National Skeet Shooting Association, and from 1987-2002 Mike Hampton was its executive director. A thousand shooters from across the globe travel to the site annually for the National Sporting Clays Championship—shooting more than a half million clay pigeons in 4 days.

The national complex in San Antonio is the largest all around shooting facility in the world.

Competition isn’t the only objective at the facility. Texas Parks and Wildlife Hunter Ed director, Steve Hall, says shooters also visit year-round to hone their skills and learn safety.

Statistically, sporting clays are very safe. In fact, we use the shooting sports to teach safety—especially to youngsters. We have many programs that combine the shooting sports with firearm safety and safe firearm handling.

Sporting clays isn’t just about turning the pigeons to dust. Charlie Wilson, a shooting instructor, says, it’s about enjoying the outdoors.

They get out into the outdoors—it’s good, it’s clean, it’s healthy…and it’s fun.

The Wildlife Restoration Program supports our series and works to increase shooting sports in Texas.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife, I’m Cecilia Nasti.

Hunter Education for Safety in the Field

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015
Getting experience shooting.

Getting experience shooting.


This is Passport to Texas

If you’re a hunter, or considering becoming one, completion of a hunter education course is a must.

13-Overall, what a person learns in Hunter Education is the safe, knowledgeable, responsible habits that hunters and shooting sports participants would need to responsibly handle a firearm from the home to the field and back again.

Steve Hall oversees hunter education at Texas Parks and Wildlife.

39-The centerpiece for hunter education is the ten commandments of firearm safety. And those apply whether you’re handling them around the gun safe at home, how to store them properly, transport them properly. And then when you’re in the field, it’s called hunter safety. For a reason. There’s other kinds of things that come into play when you’re in the field like where the other hunters are at, what kind of shooting you’re doing; do you know beyond the line of fire of a
shot? Is it on a hillside that you’re shooting and you don’t know what’s ion the other side? So there are lots of things that come into play. And then they all kind of center around knowing your firearm, knowing how to handle it safely, but also knowing the capability of those firearms as well.

Hunter education classes take place year round across the state. Find hunter education classes near you, or take it online, when you log onto the TPW website.

The Wildlife and sport fish restoration program supports our series.

For Texas Parks and Wildlife…I’m Cecilia Nasti.